Adding Value Prior to Lease Execution

19 09 2013

The ink on the lease is still wet and the parties learn that the costs for improving the leased space far exceeds the tenant improvement allowance, or the landlord’s budget for turnkey delivery. Immediately, fingers are pointing as though they’ve been run through the meat grinder. It’s crazy how often this situation occurs, whether the real estate and construction advisers and participants are rookies or wily veterans. What’s the remedy?

A significant common factor among the successful real estate practitioners who’ve established client loyalty and are rewarded with repeat business, is the compilation of a reliable team of service providers (design, legal, furniture, teledata, construction, etc.). Surround yourself with willing, responsive partners and deliver a product that sets you apart from the average competition. Are you going to settle for average? Why should your clients? 

From the construction perspective, it’s vital to understand the exposure to you and/or your client related to the issues surrounding programming, design and construction. As a former office leasing professional, I can attest to the value of understanding the worse case scenario when negotiating the terms of a lease. 

As an end user, involving a general contractor early in the site selection and programming phase can help uncover certain building deficiencies, or excess costs associated with construction in certain buildings. The astute GC will provide feedback on electrical and mechanical capacity, potential code compliance shortfalls, life safety issues, and many other components that could help determine the short list of options in the marketplace. 

The building owner or landlord is well-served by engaging the GC early in the process to understand how quickly the space can be delivered in order to realize rental income; what code changes are looming that could affect construction costs; where mechanical or electrical distribution could exceed the prorata capacity associated with the space; and, to provide a realistic construction budget and schedule such that a turnkey delivery does not go over budget. 

Regardless of which side of the table you sit, it’s smart business to arm yourself and your team with as much knowledge as possible to tilt the scales of negotiation in your favor.

Typical services include touring existing or proposed space, whether for remodel or full build from shell; offering conceptual budgeting for tenant or capital improvements; defining realistic occupancy schedules; work letter review and negotiation; and conceptual scope definition. 

  • Comprehensive budget process
  • Project estimating
  • Value engineering
  • Site selection & feasibility
  • Project scheduling
  • Product research & recommendations
  • Cost segregation & life-cycle costing
  • Multi-dimensional Building Information Modeling (BIM)
  • Forecasting based on historic experience 

 





The Value of Negotiating With Your General Contractor

22 04 2010

Tired of re-bidding, re-designing, or managing excessive change orders typical within the design/bid/build project delivery process?

Hiring a general contractor with negotiated general conditions, profit and overhead (“GC & Fee“) may be a delivery solution for you. However, it’s a process that requires trust and dedication from all parties involved. Although the competitive environment of the low-bid process is diminished slightly, the beneficial gain is realized through the team striving to achieve mutually accepted project goals in which all parties have contributed value input. Projects performed under these terms are often times more collaborative, resulting in greater overall satisfaction with the value and quality of the end product. Much of the project’s success stems from the early involvement of the entire team; providing preconstruction budgeting and scheduling in order to determine project feasibility, to establish economic parameters, and to gain preliminary “buy-in” from ancillary departments. The process of negotiating terms typically reduces the overall project schedule from concept to completion, in large part by avoiding the re-design, value engineering, and re-bid phases common to the design/bid/build delivery process.  For instance, the level of finish is agreed upon early in the design phase, and the pricing impact is provided by the Contractor on the spot, thereby avoiding the eventual sticker shock that might occur once the design documents are bid out in a design/bid/build scenario. The Owner obtains a higher level of confidence of maintaining the project goals by virtue of the team being committed with valuable input throughout the process.

The circle of trust required between the contract owner or its representatives, such as the project manager or construction manager (the “Owner”), the architect, design and engineering team (the “Architect”), and the general contractor (the “Contractor”) is a circle in which all parties will rely up the others to deliver with integrity in accordance with the negotiated terms and contract language.  For instance, the Architect will design the vision that is conveyed by the Owner, and the Contractor will act on behalf of the Owner to build the vision of the Owner in collaboration with the Architect, while achieving the best value possible as the Owner’s advocate; and, the Owner will pay for all services in accordance with the negotiated terms. If all parties play nicely together, the process leads to repeat business and extended relationships.

When the Owner does not have preexisting relationships with companies that have a proven ability to perform, it will qualify a list of architects and contractors via a request for qualifications (RFQ) process; followed by a request for proposal (RFP) to those that best qualify. As the proposals are short-listed, a selected subset of candidates are typically interviewed by the Owner to determine which company understands the project, has the chemistry to collaborate with the team, is able to display competency throughout the proposed team, and offers the best solutions and strategy. The chosen Architect and Contractor will enter into a contract with the Owner based upon negotiated terms.

The Owner should view the GC & Fee proposals with a critical eye, understanding that having a team with maximum focus, responsiveness and overall understanding of the project, the budget and the schedule, may be more important than the initial “lowest” fee. When evaluating the Contractor’s proposed financial terms, it’s important to understand if the contractor is truly able to manage and deliver the project in accordance with the proposed general conditions. The general conditions are the contractor’s direct costs associated with managing the project (including preconstruction expenses). If the contractor is afforded the opportunity to cover its true costs of AIA accepted general conditions, to receive a fee for overhead and profit to manage and warrant the craftsmanship throughout the process; then, the contractor should excercise its fiduciary role as the Owner’s advocate in maximizing project value and return on investment. It’s not uncommon for Owners to eliminate the low and the high numbers, acknowledging that projects that are under priced most often end up under resourced. Experience shows that it’s usually the candidates in the middle of the pack that best understand the project, yet are still hungry enough to be competitive.

This summary is just scratching the surface when it comes to understanding the overall costs of general conditions for any given project. I’m happy to be more specific with answers to any comments.

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